String of Hearts

String of Hearts:

String of Hearts is one of my favorites! You might also know them by the name Rosary Vine, Chain of Hearts, or Hearts Entangled. This beautiful trainling plant cascades down the side of the pot with long delicate tendrils. The long strands tend to tangle but that adds to the uniqueness of the plant. I got my first String of Hearts from my cousin as a cutting. It did so well (until I overwatered it… keeping it real here folks) and it was so fun to watch it grow each little pair of leaves. 

Light:

String of Hearts handle bright indirect light the best. You might notice them growing faster or becoming more full if they get adequate amounts of light. If you keep them in the extremes you risk stunting their growth. Too much light or direct light can burn them while too little light causes their leaves to become sparse.

Watering:

This was my downfall with these plants. String of Hearts like to dry out between waterings. This helps avoid root rot. I was watering a bit too much and root rot set in. In the summer they can tolerate a bit more water than in the winter. Decrease the amount or frequency of watering when fall and winter comes your way. 

Humidity:

The average humidity of your house is just fine for the String of Hearts. If you increase the humidity levels your plant might grow faster than it otherwise would. 

Temperature:

String of Hearts are not too picky when it comes to temperature. They can tolerate temperatures from 40 degrees fahrenheit to upwards of 85 degrees. I wouldn’t recommend leaving them outside if the temperature drops much below 55 degrees. You will also notice that you need to water more often as the temperature rises. 

Fertilizer:

It is totally ok to fertilize your String of Hearts in its most active state. More than likely this means the spring and summer for you. There are tons of options in the way of fertilizer. Whichever you choose it is best to dilute it to half or quarter strength.

Toxicity: 

String of Hearts are non-toxic to little bellies. While they may not be toxic to pets, the long strands might attract some unwanted attention from your feline or fido.

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